A Proud Shipbuilding Legacy

The Mongolia, first passenger liner built by New York Ship. Only eleven other passenger ships built in America have surpassed her in size.

Above: The Mongolia, first passenger liner built by New York Ship. Only eleven other passenger ships built in America have surpassed her in size.

Home History  A Proud Shipbuilding Legacy

Innovation and Production

With New York Shipbuilding Corporation’s final closing in 1967, Camden lost one of its principal industries, temporarily devastating the employment base of this vibrant and busy industrial city.

Over its lifetime, New York Ship produced over 670 merchant and naval ships, including 13 aircraft carriers, 26 cruisers, 51 destroyers of all types, 3 nuclear submarines, 12 naval support ships of all types, and 387 civilian merchant vessels. In addition, 9 battleships were constructed for the U.S. Navy, and another one for Argentina, making New York Ship the second largest private shipyard manufacturer in the United States.

USSJacobJonesDD130

Contract #150, the destroyer USS Jacob Jones (DD-130). From its beginning through to its closing in 1967, New York Ship was known for its naval destroyer construction, the last “tin can” completed at New York Ship being the nuclear powered USS Truxtun (DLGN-35) in 1967.

More important than these numbers is the impressive shipbuilding legacy which New York Ship left behind; a legacy of mass production techniques and innovative marine engineering which continues to impact the shipbuilding industry to this day.

The 60,000 ton, New York Ship built aircraft USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) pictured in the western Pacific Ocean in 2003. Over its forty year career, Kitty Hawk has operated off Vietnam, Desert Shield, Desert Storm, and Operation Iraqi Freedom.

The 60,000 ton, New York Ship built aircraft USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) pictured in the western Pacific Ocean in 2003. During her forty year career, Kitty Hawk operated off Vietnam, Desert Shield, Desert Storm, and Operation Iraqi Freedom.

As New York Ship lay dormant, Dr. Krishna P. Singh founded Holtec International in 1986. Dr. Singh, a visionary and entrepreneur started his career in Camden, NJ when it was a bastion of manufacturing. For 30 years Holtec prospered by supplying the energy industry unique solutions to include spent fuel casks, heat transfer equipment and engineering support. At the heart of Holtec’s success was its remarkable design and fabrication techniques. With heavy manufacturing at capacity in Pittsburgh, PA and Orville, OH, Dr. Singh decided to invest in a world class facility – the Holtec Technology Campus – at the former New York Ship. His vision – a state of the art campus, a center for technology and manufacturing innovation. Holtec intends to be the catalyst for change for the City of Camden and continue the impressive legacy of fabrication and engineering that New York Ship began over 100 years ago.